Let's Stop Pretending to Know

What’s wrong with not knowing?

We need to know — know why we get up in the morning, why the sky is blue, why we’re here and what the meaning of life is.

And that’s the reason we’ve landed on the moon, studied galaxies far away and cured deadly diseases.

We’re good at figuring things out, but sometimes we get a little bit full of ourselves. We think we know everything.

When our knowledge runs out, we make shit up to explain what we don’t know. For example, your friend doesn’t return your phone call, so you make up a reason; she’s mad at you.

You spouse is late coming home from work. It’s not like him to be late; obviously he’s having an affair. Or dead in a ditch.

You soon learn that your friend’s phone was broken and your husband was stuck in a late meeting, but what about the bigger stuff?

We know a whole lot of stuff, but we don’t know everything. We know that when you drop a coffee cup on a tile floor, it breaks. It has to do with gravity, the molecular makeup of the ceramic, density of the floor, whatever, I don’t really understand it, but we humans have basically figured out why the cup breaks. That’s easy.

But everything isn’t easy. What happens when we die? Everyone has a theory, but the fact is that we don’t know. We really, really don’t know. I’m not sure we even have the proper perspective to even begin to understand what happens after we die.

We are good at figuring things out, but if we don’t admit that we don’t know, we’re screwed.